Asthma Articles A-Z

Maxair Dosage - Proair HFA Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Asthma Articles containing information on subjects from Maxair Dosage to Proair HFA Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Maxair Dosage
    The recommended Maxair dosage for preventing or treating an asthma attack is two sprays. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Maxair dosing, including a list of precautions and tips for using the inhaler.
  • Maxair Drug Interactions
    Certain drugs -- including MAOIs, beta blockers, and some diuretics -- can cause Maxair drug interactions. This eMedTV page lists other medicines that may lead to drug interactions with Maxair and describes the possible side effects that may occur.
  • Maxair Inhaler
    The Maxair inhaler is often prescribed to treat and prevent bronchospasms. This segment from the eMedTV Web site describes how Maxair is different from other inhalers and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug.
  • Maxair Overdose
    Nausea, chest pain, and a fast heart rate are among the possible signs of a Maxair overdose. This part of the eMedTV library lists other potential Maxair overdose symptoms and describes treatment options for an overdose on Maxair.
  • Maxair Side Effects
    Some of the most common Maxair side effects include dizziness, tremors, and headaches. This eMedTV segment also describes uncommon side effects of Maxair and lists serious problems that you should report to your doctor immediately (such as depression).
  • Maxair Uses
    Maxair is used for treating asthma and other similar lung problems, such as bronchospasm due to COPD. As this eMedTV Web page explains, "off-label" Maxair uses may also include the prevention of exercise-induced asthma attacks.
  • Maxair Warnings and Precautions
    Maxair can cause a worsening of bronchospasms (spasms of the airways) in some people. This eMedTV page covers other Maxair warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking the drug while nursing or pregnant and people who shouldn't take it.
  • Metaproteranol
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, metaproterenol is used to treat bronchospasms caused by certain respiratory conditions, such as COPD. This article also offers a link to more information. Metaproteranol is a common misspelling of metaproterenol.
  • Metaproterenol
    Metaproterenol is a prescription drug that is approved to treat bronchospasms due to asthma or COPD. This eMedTV page covers side effects, dosing guidelines, and strengths of the medicine -- as well as what to do if you miss a dose.
  • Metaproterenol Dosing
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended dose of metaproterenol is two or three sprays as needed -- but not to exceed 12 sprays a day. This page also lists factors that can affect metaproterenol dosing (such as other drugs you're taking).
  • Metaproterenol Sulfate (Alupent)
    This eMedTV page gives an overview of metaproterenol (Alupent), a beta agonist medication. This article looks at the conditions this medication was approved to treat and explains why metaproterenol sulfate is no longer sold in the United States.
  • Metaproternol
    This eMedTV resource offers a basic overview of metaproterenol, a drug commonly used to treat bronchospasms. This article also provides a link to more detailed information. Metaproternol is a common misspelling of metaproterenol.
  • Metatproteronol
    Metaproterenol is a drug commonly used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Metatproteronol is a common misspelling of metaproterenol.
  • Monteleukast
    Montelukast can be prescribed to treat some nasal allergy symptoms and asthma attacks. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug, including its forms and how it works. Monteleukast is a common misspelling of montelukast.
  • Montelikast
    Nasal allergy symptoms and asthma attacks can both be treated with montelukast. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief explanation of the drug and offers a link to more information. Montelikast is a common misspelling of montelukast.
  • Montelucast
    As this eMedTV resource explains, montelukast can be used in the treatment of asthma attacks and nasal allergy symptoms. This page also explains possible side effects and who can take the drug. Montelucast is a common misspelling of montelukast.
  • Montelucaste
    Nasal allergy symptoms and asthma attacks can be treated with montelukast. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and lists its various forms. A link to more information is also included. Montelucaste is a common misspelling of montelukast.
  • Montelukast
    Montelukast has been licensed as a treatment for asthma attacks and allergic rhinitis (runny, stuffy nose). This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth overview of the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Montelukast Dosing
    The recommended dosage of montelukast is based on several factors, which this eMedTV resource explains. Typical dosing guidelines for the prevention of asthma and nasal allergies are provided, as are helpful tips for those taking the prescription drug.
  • Montelukast Sodium
    Montekulast sodium is a prescription medicine commonly used to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis. This eMedTV Web page explains how this medication works and lists some of the potential side effects that may occur with its use.
  • Montlukast
    Montelukast, as this eMedTV article explains, is used to treat both allergic rhinitis and certain types of asthma attacks. This page describes how the drug works and lists a few side effects. Montlukast is a common misspelling of montelukast.
  • Natural Remedies for Asthma
    Many people choose to use natural remedies for asthma, even though there is no evidence that they work. This eMedTV segment describes these alternative treatments in detail, such as acupuncture and massage, including the results of limited studies.
  • Palmacort
    This page of the eMedTV archives provides a brief overview of Pulmicort, a prescription medication used to prevent asthma attacks. The page also includes a link to more detailed information. Palmacort is a common misspelling of Pulmicort.
  • Picnogenol
    Pycnogenol allegedly helps with several health conditions, such as high cholesterol. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of the supplement and provides a link to more detailed information. Picnogenol is a common misspelling of Pycnogenol.
  • Picnoginol
    As this segment of the eMedTV library explains, Pycnogenol is claimed to help with several medical conditions. This page provides a brief overview of Pycnogenol and links to more detailed information. Picnoginol is a common misspelling of Pycnogenol.
  • Plumicort
    This eMedTV resource explains how Pulmicort works to prevent asthma attacks. It also describes the different forms and possible side effects, and a link to more in-depth information is included. Plumicort is a common misspelling of Pulmicort.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Budesonide Inhalation
    Taking budesonide inhalation could cause your asthma symptoms to become worse. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers other important precautions and warnings with budesonide inhalation, including information on who should not use the medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cromolyn Inhalation
    Cromolyn inhalation may cause an immediate worsening of asthma symptoms. This part of the eMedTV archives contains other precautions and warnings with cromolyn inhalation and lists certain existing medical conditions your doctor should know about.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Flunisolide Inhalers
    Flunisolide inhalers should not replace fast-acting rescue inhalers that are used to treat asthma attacks. This eMedTV page offers more precautions and warnings with flunisolide inhalers, including some of the side effects that may occur with the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Formoterol
    This eMedTV page examines some of the precautions and warnings with formoterol, such as the possibility of the drug causing a stimulatory effect on the heart and blood pressure. This page also explains those who should avoid the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Levalbuterol HFA
    In some cases, Levalbuterol HFA can worsen asthma symptoms. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides other precautions and warnings with levalbuterol HFA and lists other possible side effects that can occur while taking this drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Metaproterenol
    Metaproterenol can make asthma symptoms worse in some people and may not be safe to take during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource highlights other precautions and warnings with metaproterenol, and explains who should not take the medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Montelukast
    Various precautions and warnings with montelukast are provided in this eMedTV article. This includes a list of people who may be advised to avoid the drug, as well as things to discuss with your healthcare provider prior to beginning treatment.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Salmeterol
    Some people who take salmeterol may be more likely to have severe asthma attacks. This eMedTV page contains other precautions and warnings with salmeterol, including the safety of taking the drug while nursing and people who shouldn't take it at all.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Zafirlukast
    Zafirlukast can cause liver damage in some people. This part of the eMedTV library contains other important precautions and warnings with zafirlukast, including the safety of taking the drug while nursing and people who should not take it at all.
  • Preventel
    Airway spasms that occur with asthma or other conditions can be treated and prevented with Proventil. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of the drug and includes a link to more information. Preventel is a common misspelling of Proventil.
  • Preventil
    Airway spasms associated with certain medical conditions can be treated and prevented with Proventil. This eMedTV page briefly explains how the drug works, how it is packaged, and possible side effects. Preventil is a common misspelling of Proventil.
  • Prevention of Asthma
    This eMedTV page offers tips for the prevention of asthma, including suggestions on avoiding allergens and irritants. Although completely preventing attacks is impossible, there are certain things you can do to lower your chances of experiencing them.
  • Pro Air
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Proair HFA to treat asthma attacks. This eMedTV article describes potential side effects of Proair HFA and explains what to tell your doctor prior to using the inhaler. Pro Air is a common misspelling of Proair HFA.
  • Proair HFA
    Proair HFA is a drug used to treat and prevent airway spasms. This eMedTV article discusses other uses of the prescription inhaler (like preventing exercise-induced asthma attacks), as well as its possible side effects and general dosing guidelines.
  • Proair HFA and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether it is safe to use Proair HFA while breastfeeding. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that you and your doctor should make a shared decision about Proair HFA and breastfeeding for your particular situation.
  • Proair HFA and Pregnancy
    There are possible risks associated with using Proair HFA during pregnancy. This eMedTV article discusses the results of animal studies on Proair HFA and pregnancy, and explains when a physician may still prescribe the inhaler to pregnant women.
  • Proair HFA Dosage
    The Proair HFA dosage to treat or prevent an asthma attack or prevent exercise-induced asthma is two sprays. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at Proair HFA dosing guidelines and offers tips and precautions for using the inhaler.
  • Proair HFA Drug Interactions
    If you are taking MAOIs or beta blockers while taking Proair HFA, drug interactions may potentially occur. This eMedTV segment lists other drugs that may cause interactions with Proair HFA and explains how these interactions may lead to problems.
  • Proair HFA Overdose
    A Proair HFA overdose may cause symptoms such as chest pain, dizziness, and seizures. This page on the eMedTV Web site outlines other possible symptoms of a Proair HFA overdose and describes possible treatment options (which involve supportive care).
  • Proair HFA Side Effects
    Among the side effects that can potentially occur with Proair HFA are dizziness, headaches, and pain. This eMedTV resource also lists uncommon Proair HFA side effects (such as diarrhea) and serious side effects that can occur (such as anxiety).
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